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What does SSl stand for?

SSl stands for South Slavic (linguistics)

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We have 270 other meanings of SSl in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

We do have a couple of obituaries, but it is also appropriate to acknowledge the passing of two distinguished scholarly figures: Alexander 'Sandy' Fenton (1929-2012), ethnologist and champion of vernacular culture, founder of the European Ethnological Research Centre and the Review of Scottish Culture, and director of the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland; and John Miles Foley (1947-2012), scholar of comparative literature and founder of the journal Oral Tradition, whose work with ancient Greek, Old English, and South Slavic literatures has done much to advance the Parry--Lord theory of oral literature.
2) Curiously enough, even Serbian, which is a South Slavic language, bears a great, if not a most relevant, similarity to child both in its current meaning 'offspring' and its obsolete meaning 'young male servant, lad in service' (noted in ME for the first time in 1382, to become obsolete by the beginning of the 17th century).
Anthony's College, Oxford, contributes a chapter about early activities of the BFBS in the Levant; and Peter Kuzmic from the Evangelical Theological Seminary in Zagreb and Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary deals with the efforts of the Bible societies to translate the Bible into the South Slavic languages.
Montenegro, with its 13,812 square kilometers of territory and some 620,000 people, was a sovereign state when it decided in 1918 to join a union of south Slavic nations under Serbian kings, which later became Yugoslavia.
Montenegro, with its 13,812 square kilometers of territory and some 620,000 people, was a sovereign state when it decided in 1918 to join a union of south Slavic nations under Serbian kings, which later became Yugoslavia.
They are gathered as students in a course on South Slavic literatures taught by a female refugee professor from Zagreb, but their student status and their motives for taking the course are as accidental as they are pragmatic.
Not content with these bold but textually derived hypotheses, Parry then sought to prove them by analogy in the living laboratory of South Slavic oral epic, to which his own mentor Antoine Meillet and the Slavic philologist Matija Murko had alerted him.