Printer friendly
Acronymfinder

What does UNC stand for?

UNC stands for United National Congress (Trinidad and Tobago)


This definition appears very frequently and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Organizations, NGOs, schools, universities, etc.

See other definitions of UNC

Other Resources:
We have 102 other meanings of UNC in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

Mr Warner is leaving Fifa by his own volition after nearly 30 years of service, having chosen to focus on his important work on behalf of the people and government of Trinidad & Tobago as a Cabinet Minister and as the Chairman of the United National Congress, the major party in his country's coalition government," it added.
Mr Warner is leaving Fifa by his own volition after nearly 30 years of service, having chosen to focus on his important work on behalf of the people and government of Trinidad and Tobago as a Cabinet Minister and as the chairman of the United National Congress, the major party in his country's coalition government.
Mr Warner is leaving Fifa by his own volition after nearly 30 years of service, having chosen to focus on his important work on behalf of the people and government of Trinidad & Tobago as a Cabinet Minister and as the Chairman of the United National Congress, the major party in his country's coalition government," it added.
Basdeo Panday, who led Trinidad and Tobago from 1995 to 2001 as the first prime minister of East Indian descent, had been a player in the twin-island nation's politics for 44 years and founded the opposition United National Congress.
The main opposition party, the United National Congress (UNC), which won 15 seats in parliament, has its base largely among Trinidadians of East Indian descent.
The three main contenders for the 41-seat parliament--39 in Trinidad and two in sister-island Tobago--are the ruling People's National Movement, the opposition United National Congress and the Congress of the People.
The 69-year-old leader of the opposition United National Congress appeared before a magistrate in Port of Spain to answer the corruption charges.