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Acronymfinder

What does TAC stand for?

TAC stands for Terminal Attack Control


This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Military and Government

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We have 740 other definitions for TAC in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

Special Operations Command deputy commander; Joint staff, J8; chief of Air Force, Royal Australian air force; chief of Army, Australian army; and the director, Operations and Training Department, Ministry of Defence of Hungary, defines the JFO as: "A trained service member who can request, adjust, and control surface-to-surface Fires, provide targeting information in support of Type II and III CAS terminal attack controls, and perform autonomous terminal guidance operations.
JACI now conducts a two-week Joint Fires Observer Course (JFOC) to produce JFOs: trained service members who can request, adjust and control surface-to-surface fires, provide targeting information in support of Types 2 and 3 close air support (CAS) terminal attack controls and perform autonomous terminal guidance operations (TGO).
During this campaign, Air Force special operators have: * Flown nearly 4,000 hours and more than 1,100 sorties in support of combat operations * Conducted multiple personnel recovery operations--to include the rescue and recovery of our POWs * Secured key Iraqi oil fields from the start of hostilities * Provided Unconventional Warfare assistance, terminal attack control and intelligence support to friendly forces * And, secured the western portion of Iraq--preventing enemy missile launches, and seizing airfields vital to the combatant commander's scheme of maneuver These operations continue to the present, with Air Commandos going in harm's way even as we speak.
The Army and Air Force define a JFO as a "trained service member who can request, adjust and control surface-to-surface fires, provide targeting information in support of Types 2 and 3 CAS terminal attack controls and perform autonomous terminal guidance operations.
Within the constraints established during risk assessment, the intent is to offer the lowest level supported commander the latitude to determine which type of terminal attack control best accomplishes the mission.
Dependent upon Air Force controllers by inter-service agreement, several Army ground unit commanders said they did not have enough JTACs to conduct terminal attack control in support of their forces.