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Acronymfinder

What does LRNA stand for?

LRNA stands for League of Residential Neighborhood Advocates (Los Angeles, CA)


This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Organizations, NGOs, schools, universities, etc.

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Samples in periodicals archive:

for Thursday (July 10) --(BUSINESS WIRE) Lawsuit Expected to Lead to Supreme Court Challenge of Federal Legislation Granting Special Consideration to Religious Groups on Land Use Issues WHAT: The League of Residential Neighborhood Advocates (LRNA), a new non-profit organization formed by residents of Hancock Park to protect homeowners rights, will be joined by homeowners from Granada Hills and Boyle Heights as the organization announces its filing of a lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles and the Orthodox Jewish Congregation Etz Chaim.
News Editors LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--July 10, 2003 Lawsuit Expected to Lead to Direct Supreme Court Challenge of New Federal Legislation Giving Special Consideration to Religious Groups The League of Residential Neighborhood Advocates (LRNA), a new non-profit organization formed to protect and preserve home owners' rights and the integrity of neighborhoods, today filed a lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles and the Congregation of Etz Chaim, which seeks, in part, to prevent use of a rebuilt neighborhood home for what is expected to be a three-story, 8,100-square-foot synagogue in the heart of the long-time residential community.
Business Editors LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--July 10, 2003 Lawsuit Expected to Lead to Direct Supreme Court Challenge of Federal Legislation Giving Special Privileges to Religious Groups in Local Planning Issues The League of Residential Neighborhood Advocates (LRNA), a new non-profit organization formed to protect and preserve homeowners rights, the integrity of neighborhoods and serve as a resource for neighborhoods under threat of inappropriate uses of buildings for religious purposes, today filed a lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles and the Congregation of Etz Chaim which seeks, in part, to prevent use of a rebuilt neighborhood home for what is expected to be a three-story, 8,100-square-foot synagogue in the heart of the long-time residential community.