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What does HWS stand for?

HWS stands for Hazardous Waste Site

This definition appears somewhat frequently and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Military and Government
  • Science, medicine, engineering, etc.

See other definitions of HWS

Other Resources:
We have 75 other meanings of HWS in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

The topics include hazardous waste sources and volumes, the uncertain state of knowledge about the effects of hazardous waste sites, abandoned hazardous waste dumpsites in New Jersey, constraint mapping and location standards as planning tools, and changes needed to gain credibility.
Categories: March 2, 2011, Agency evaluation, Agency missions, Air pollution control, Climate change, Environmental cleanups, Environmental law, Environmental monitoring, Environmental policies, Environmental protection, Federal regulations, Hazardous waste site remediation, Hazardous waste sites, Human capital management, Interagency relations, Internal controls, Law enforcement, Program evaluation, Program management, Public lands, Regulatory agencies, Risk assessment, Risk management, Strategic planning, Superfund Program, Toxic substances, Water pollution, Water pollution control
The manual covers: air monitoring and sampling programs; air monitoring and sampling techniques; air monitoring and sampling equipment; instrument calibration; exposure guidelines; air dispersion modeling; health and safety considerations; operating procedures for specific air monitoring and sampling equipment; strategies for air monitoring and sampling at abandoned hazardous waste sites and for accidental releases of hazardous chemicals.
Coursey says he "was pretty shocked" to discover that they could find little evidence of actual pollution at many of the locations listed as hazardous waste sites.
A new audit finds that the Superfund program, which has rehabilitated only about 100 of the more than 1,400 hazardous waste sites on its list, has become seriously bogged down.
He believes that all of Niagara Falls--having long been a dumping ground for the chemical industry giants that sustained its economy for nearly a century--is itself one huge hazardous waste site.