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What does HFR stand for?

HFR stands for Halogenated Flame Retardant (chemical product)

This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

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  • Business, finance, etc.

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We have 67 other meanings of HFR in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

CLARIANT ADDITIVE MASTERBATCHES Cesa-flam masterbatches offer a wide range of efficient and universally usable halogenated flame retardants as well as some specific halogen-free solutions.
HERNDON, VA -- A new white paper reports on the progress of major OEMs toward removing halogenated flame retardants and PVC from desktop and laptop PCs.
The group's primary focus is to: * Advance environmentally friendly non-halogenated flame retardant solutions in North America * Bring together manufacturers and users of major flame retardant technologies * Support fire safety through innovative, reliable and sustainable fire performance solutions, using products based on halogen free phosphorus (P), nitrogen (N) and inorganic compound (metal ions, hydroxides) * Sponsor and participate in conferences/workshops on flame retardants and end uses * Monitor and work with industry and regulatory organizations Halogenated flame retardants pose risk factors which has compelled industry and government regulators to consider non halogen alternatives.
The company says there was no effective way to combine flame retardants and UV stabilisers, as light activates a chemical reaction between the halogenated flame retardant and HALS stabilisers, which causes the deactivation of the light stabilising properties.
CLARIANT ADDITIVE MASTERBATCHES Cesa-flam masterbatches offer a wide range of efficient and universally usable halogenated flame retardants as well as some specific halogen-free solutions.
Environmental and health concerns over halogenated flame retardant chemicals should also allow additional market share for halogen replacements, especially in parts of Europe where bans on specific halogenated chemicals exist.