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Acronymfinder

What does FTE stand for?

FTE stands for Failure to Extract (firearms)


This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Military and Government

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We have 87 other definitions for FTE in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

The symposium also sought to empower women by encouraging them to set up their own private businesses, developing skills of entrepreneurship and preparing them to become self-reliant, while at the same time reviewing the success stories of entrepreneurs at different economic sectors, studying the causes of failure to extract lessons, paying attention to illicit trade and proposing solutions for combatting it, revising the legislations and policies for the SMEs, proposing amendments to them, revising finance opportunities, technical support programmes and how to help establish a conducive environment for the success and growth of SMEs.
All point to the President's stalled initiative to revive the Middle East peace process, to his failure to extract even a suspension of Israeli settlement activities in the occupied Palestinian territories -- the most basic precondition for any resumption of talks; they point to the fact that one of his first decisions as Nobel Peace laureate may be to order more American troops into Afghanistan; to the realisation that, for all his overtures, the Iranian nuclear showdown remains as frightening as ever.
But his failure to extract even the smallest concession from the iron-fisted regime plays into the hands of critics, who warned him against visiting at the same time as Aung San Suu Kyi faces an internationally condemned trial.
But his failure to extract even the smallest concession from the iron-fisted regime plays into the hands of critics, who warned him against visiting while Aung San Suu Kyi faces an internationally condemned trial.
There are three approaches to torture: 1) an absolute ban as required by the Geneva Conventions, which laid out the international standards for the humane treatment of prisoners of war and enemy civilians; 2) some kind of principle of proportionality that would permit different degrees of ill treatment depending on the deleterious consequences of doing nothing--the so-called "ticking bomb" justification where failure to extract information would result in failure to discover a bomb set to go off imminently (although in the real world the bomb is rarely ticking); 3) the view that suggests that if the military command states that there is a valid military goal, all rules can be ignored.