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Acronymfinder

What does EME stand for?

EME stands for Electromagnetic Environment


This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Science, medicine, engineering, etc.

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We have 96 other definitions for EME in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

: In addition, chains acquisitions will be subject to the electromagnetic environment very restrictive installation and LMJ entries scanners will withstand high levels of transient noise (peak amplitude 200 V / 50 Ohms / 200 ps FWHM + peak amplitude of 30 V / 50 Ohms / 6 ns FWHM, low recurrence).
Maintain distance of 300 meters from vehicle during operation [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Vehicle Range Obstacles THE RANGE AT WHICH THE LIGHT FLAIL CAN BE EFFECTIVELY CONTROLLED BY THE OPERATOR CONTROL UNIT (OCU) VARIES WITH THE TERRAIN, WEATHER, ELECTROMAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT, AND THE DENSITY OF ANY OBSTACLES BETWEEN THE VEHICLE AND THE OCU.
It also states that the SAF continues to develop a military training system unique with the strategic missile force, improve the conditions of on-base, simulated and networked training, conduct trans-regional maneuvers and training with opposing forces in complex electromagnetic environments, Xinhua reports.
Building a bridge between these two elements is a custom-built resonating and receiving system of VLF antennae monitoring the local electromagnetic environment and the effects of the solar winds on our atmosphere.
CJ also provides the capability to effectively manage the electromagnetic environment by optimizing the spectrum being used, provide enhanced operational spectrum planning and collaboration with other CJ users both horizontally and vertically.
to update policy and responsibilities for the management and implementation of the DOD Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Program to ensure mutual electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and effective E3 control among ground, air, sea, and space-based electronic and electrical systems, subsystems, and equipment, and with the existing natural and man-made electromagnetic environment (EME).
The other volume contains seven chapters on the development of avionic systems, discussing processes for engineering a system, digital avionics modeling and simulation, formal methods, electronic hardware reliability, the electromagnetic environment, design guidance and certification considerations of integrated modular avionics, and certification of civil avionics.