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What does COE stand for?

COE stands for Course of Empire (band)


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It's pretty epic stuff, and there are literally hundreds of hours that can be spent moulding the course of empires, bringing war or peace to factions in conflict, and driving the ultimate fate of the world you find yourself.
It's pretty epic stuff, and there are literally hundreds of hours that can be spent moulding the course of empires, bringing war or peace to factions in conflict, and driving the ultimate fate of the world you find yourself.
It's pretty epic stuff, and there are literally hundreds of hours that can be spent moulding the course of empires, bringing war or peace to factions in conflict, and driving the ultimate fate of the world you find yourself.
His inaugural exhibition at Zach Feuer was packed, and unevenly so: Upon entering, you encountered racks of plastic video-game cases with labels showing Thomas Cole's early-nineteenth-century Course of Empire landscapes; a granite floor plaque engraved with the names and closing dates of defunct New York State malls; stacks of a newsprint giveaway featuring an essay, oral histories, and a back-page comic strip; two Alienware laptops, one wrapped in fake reptilian skin, the other in fleshy epoxy; three featureless and fluidly warped urethane busts; an environment resembling a suburban den dusted with volcanic ash; displays of masks and weaponry alternately inspired by African tribal sculpture and sci-fi film props; and, interspersed throughout, several videos on flat-screen monitors.
It renders the story of America and our westward course of empire in the most beautiful and heartbreaking manner imaginable.
Several wonderfully elaborated essays: Arthur Saltzman's well-reasoned "Cranks of Ev'ry Radius," which documents the optimistic linearity of the novel; Donald Greiner's insightful "Thomas Pynchon and the Fault Lines of America," which points out that Mason and Dixon are both "New World Adams [as in Eve] who pushed westward yet find not an Edenic paradise or a soiled hell but both"; and David Seed's "Mapping the Course of Empire in the New World," which regards surveying matters; and Joseph Dewey's "The Sound of One Man Mapping," quite brilliant on Pynchon and "balance.