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Acronymfinder

What does CCRF stand for?

CCRF stands for Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms


This definition appears very rarely and is found in the following Acronym Finder categories:

  • Military and Government

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We have 43 other definitions for CCRF in our Acronym Attic

Samples in periodicals archive:

Leishman enumerates the various religious and academic groups that applauded this decision, including the counsel of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, who "laud(ed) it as a 'strong affirmation and much needed reminder that freedom of religion is a fundamental human right and public freedom that is guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms .
With a doctorate in education administration and twelve years' experience working for the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission, she is aptly qualified to present her position that corporal punishment is a violation of children rights, contrary to the guarantees of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
In the preface to his new book, Against Judicial Activism, published this spring by McGill-Queen's University Press, Leishman forthrightly confesses that in 1981, "I was one of the more enthusiastic supporters of the proposed Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
1985: Section 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which deals with equality rights, comes into effect, with discrimination explicitly prohibited on the grounds of "race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.
While international law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantee the freedom of conscience, it remains a little known and largely undeveloped freedom.
The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the expansive human rights codes that were enacted in the 1980s were supposed to safeguard and enhance the rights and freedoms of Canadians.
Today, in addition to indirectly challenging such laws through the ballot box, Canadians have the option of directly challenging these laws in court by arguing that they violate the basic rights and freedoms of Canadians as guaranteed by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (the Charter).